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    yagazieemezi:

    When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 

    Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 

    "It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. “It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be.”

    Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 

    "I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself." (keep reading)

    Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

    Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic


    (Source: exteriors)


    bishopmyles:

    ratedmirr:

    nakedxxxcelebs:

    Khaneshia ‘KJ’ Smith-Kamille Leai

    this is off that show survivor something. but any who… her body is rocking

    She’s gorgeous ._. damn


    mia-redworth:

    💐

    (Source: mia-Redworth)


    ellendegeneres:

    Whose pick-up line is better? 

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